BRADFORD, AIRE/WHARFE, PUB & REAL BEER NEWS

The old brewery name of Waller has been revived for a new bar in the Sunbridge Wells complex at Ivegate, Millergate and under Sunbridge Road, Bradford. Waller’s connection with the property began in 1868 when the firm purchased old established business Laycock’s wine and spirit vaults (also known as the Spotted Ox) situated in Ivegate and Millergate at auction for £7,525. The property had extensive cellars, and the deal also included the adjoining disused Queen’s Mills Brewery. Waller & Son later centred their wine, spirit and bottling business at the property under a partnership titled Waller & Smith. This was made up of Thomas William Waller and John Smith tenant of the property. The latter gentleman was described as a self-made man having commenced in the trade as a waiter in the year 1852. For a number of years he was landlord of the Boy & Barrel. By the time of his death, aged sixty in May 1892 he was said to be worth not less than £40,000. The business was absorbed into Waller & Son Limited at the start of 1892. Around four years earlier Laycock’s Vaults had been renamed Grosvenor Hotel.


BREWERY HISTORY, PUB & BREWERY NEWS FROM CITY OF BRADFORD METROPOLITAN DISTRICT

BREWERY HISTORY, PUB & BREWERY NEWS FROM CITY OF BRADFORD METROPOLITAN DISTRICT

Malcolm Toft’s Real Beer News

Malcolm Toft’s Real Beer News

FROM SILSDEN, YORKSHIRE, TO THE WORLD - UPDATED 21.30 GMT 6/3/2017



Charles Waller, founder of Waller & Co; was in business as a grocer at Well Street, Bradford, in 1841. Four years later Charles Waller & Co., were listed in the local trade directory as a grocer, tea dealer and druggist at Bridge House, Kirkgate. This property stood only a short distance from his previous premises. Around 1851 the firm acquired a warehouse at Bermondsey, Bradford. There they carried on dealing in tea, and had added the manufacture of vinegar. This part of the town entre swept away in the 1880’s with the extension of the Midland railway station and the construction of the adjoining new hotel; now only the latter remains.

At some stage Charles Waller decided that using malt to produce beer might be more profitable. Plans for a proposed brewery to be built on land adjoining the Leeds and Bradford Railway at Trafalgar Street, off Manningham Lane, were submitted to Bradford Council in late 1852 and these were approved the following January.  

An advert was placed in the Bradford Observer from February to early March 1853 calling for tenders to be submitted from  masons,  joiners, plumbers and slaters for the building work required for the erection of a brewery.

Production had commenced by December of the same year. Advertisements were carried n the press. Headed “Steam Brewery, Trafalgar Street, Manningham Lane, Bradford”. “Waller & Co” begged to announce to the “Trade and the Public generally that they had a large Stock on hand ready for immediate use, of Very superior ales, all of which have been brewed on the newest and most approved scientific principle and from the finest malt and hops”. They further added that “their ales defy competition, and are sold on the most reasonable terms”. In April of the next year customers were invited to call at the brewery to taste samples. Bitter beer, porter, stout and mild ales, were then available.

Thomas W. Waller, eldest son of Charles Waller, began managing the concern c1867 and shortly after to reflect alterations in leadership the company’s name was changed to Waller & Son. The company was formed into a limited liabilities company in September 1887, with the title Waller & Son Limited, the purchase price was £180,000.T. W. Waller, the vendor and promoter of the venture received £80,000 in cash. Along with £40,000 in shares and he allowed £60,000 to remain on the mortgage of their freehold properties for twelve years. T.W.W. became the new company’s first chairman and managing director.

At the time of floatation the brewery premises covered an area of 4,000 square yards, and had a frontage of 295 feet onto Trafalgar Street. The plant had a capacity of 30,000 to 40,000 barrels per annum, brewed with water from a well-sunk on site. An almost new malting could produce 4,000 quarters a year. Offices, cooperage, stabling for twenty horses, boilerhouse, store rooms, spirit warehouse, wine cellars, joiner’s, plumber’s and blacksmith’s shops, made up the rest of the facilities on site. The firm controlled sixty-five licensed houses.

In February 1914 it was announced that the Trafalgar Brewery would be sold to the Midland Railway. The purchase for demolition was to enable the building of the Bradford “through line”. The scheme was designed to put Bradford on the main line, connecting the cities two end-of-the-line stations; One terminus was owned by the Midland Railway and the other by the Great Northern. Part of the scheme would have involved building a viaduct across Foster Square and a high level station at the Midland terminus.

The brewing company were initially given eighteen months to vacate the property. A price of £80,000 had been agreed for the premises. The sum was to allow for the building of a new brewery or buy an existing property. Waller's acquired a three acre site at Four Lane Ends, Girlington, which it was said had a water supply sufficient to meet the needs of all the breweries in Bradford. Plans were drawn up for a new brewery, but due to the Great War they were never acted upon.

Brear & Brown Ltd; brewers of Hipperholme went into during liquidation during 1916. Waller’s brewery succeeded in acquiring the business by outbidding Ramsden of Halifax. They offered £95,150, one hundred pounds more than their competitor. Twenty-two of the circa sixty-four Brear & Brown public houses were then sold to Ramsden’s local rival Richard Whitaker & Sons. Production of Waller’s beers was transferred to Hipperholme. The Trafalgar Brewery buildings were used by a number of different industries until 1953, when demolition took place. Royal Mail transport section now occupied the site for a time but this  has in its  turn been replaced.

A London syndicate purchased Waller & Son Ltd., in 1925, and reformed the company under the title Waller’s Bradford Brewery Ltd, despite the brewery being outside Bradford. At that time the business controlled 110 properties, comprised of 58 fully licensed, 37 beerhouses, and 15 off-licences. Ninety of these premises were situated n Bradford, the remaining twenty, all within ten miles of the brewery, occupied locations in Leeds, Halifax, and the Spen Valley. Managers ran twenty-nine of the houses.

In March 1935 came news of an offer from Leeds & Wakefield Breweries (trading as Melbourne Brewery, Leeds.) Ltd., which was said to be one of seven received. Waller’s board of directors recommended acceptance of the Leeds company’s terms.

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Above are the two sides of a beermat introduced in 1958 when Melbourne Brewery (Leeds) Ltd; acquired Russell’s and Wrangham Ltd; of Malton, through a share exchange deal. At the beginning of 1958 the Melbourne Brewery registered company name had been changed from Leeds and Wakefield Breweries Ltd.

The Melbourne Brewery gained 90 public houses through the takeover. Early in 1960 the directors of Melbourne Brewery approached J. Tetley and Son Ltd; and asked their former Leeds rival to purchase their company. Melbourne had been in talks with Hammonds United Breweries Ltd; of Bradford who were also negotiating Hope and Anchor Breweries Ltd; of Sheffield. Hammonds and Hope and Anchor subsequently joined with John Jeffrey and Co. Ltd; Edinburgh to form Northern Breweries Ltd; in March 1960.

Tetley paid £3.5 m on April 1 1960, to acquired Melbourne Brewery, 245 pubs and the businesses share capital.


Melbourne beermat after takeover of Russells 1958 Melbourne beermat after takeover of Russells 1958.